Did the Israeli army really use a medieval catapult to launch fiery projectiles into Lebanon?

Does the Israeli army use weapons dating from the Middle Ages? According to a CNN article, IDF troops may have used a trebuchet to catapult flaming projectiles over the Lebanese border, as attacks intensify in this area with Lebanese Hezbollah, supported by Iran.

In a video, published Wednesday on social networks, we can see the catapult in action, surrounded by soldiers, while a flaming projectile passes over a wall. TF1 identifies the fortification as the “very imposing wall erected in the area by the Hebrew state in 2018”. CNN indicates that it was unable to verify the date of the images, but was able to geolocate them to the Israeli-Lebanese border.

« Initiative locale »

The trebuchet is a war weapon, tilted and counterweighted, from medieval artillery. Used for sieges in particular, it allows you to launch projectiles and destroy fortifications. It was the most powerful weapon of the 12th and 15th centuries before being replaced by gunpowder cannons.

Asked about the subject, the Israeli Defense Forces indicated that the use of this catapult was a “local initiative” and that it had not been “widely used”, according to the Kan public channel, affiliated with CNN. Still according to this media, this trebuchet is probably used to burn vegetation which would allow the army to clear the area and thus more easily identify Hezbollah members who would try to reach the border.

A zone under tension

Since the start of the war between Israel and Hamas in Gaza, Hezbollah has regularly exchanged fire with the Israeli army, from Lebanon, in support of the Palestinian Islamist movement, its ally. This violence has already left at least 471 dead in Lebanon, most of them fighters but also including 91 civilians, according to an AFP count based on data from Hezbollah and official Lebanese sources. On the Israeli side, at least 15 soldiers and 11 civilians were killed, according to the authorities.

 

The attacks have intensified since the death of one of its most important commanders, Taleb Sami Abdallah, killed last Tuesday in an Israeli strike on a house in Jouaiyya, in southern Lebanon, bordering northern Israel. In retaliation, Hezbollah targeted the north of the Jewish state, which caused a series of fires, leading to evacuations and destruction.

By Editor

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