Hurricane “Aida” made its way to New York, and residents saw unusual views unprecedented in the past. We put mattresses on tables and slept on them so that the water from the flood would not reach us “






N12


Floods and floods, heavy rain and stormy winds: New York City residents have already seen and experienced unusual natural phenomena, but the sights yesterday in the city were extraordinary for them as well. Heavy rain fell in a short period of time, which led the authorities to declare a state of emergency, and some even described the sights as “historic”.

Between 20:51 in the evening and 21:51, the wettest hour in its history was recorded in Central Park: 80 mm of precipitation. Authorities reported that in just 3 hours, 132 mm of rain fell and N12 forecasters The city is the reason the drainage system collapsed in such a way and a lot of damage was done.

In New Jersey, too, the daily rainfall record of 1977 was broken – then it dropped 171 mm in 24 hours, compared to last Wednesday when the showers reached 211 mm per day. In the Queens borough of New York, a 48-year-old woman died after calling the 911 emergency center and reporting that she was in severe flooding conditions and in total the number of victims rose to eight, including a two-year-old toddler.

The floods in New York | Photo: Reuters
New York Hurricane (Photo: Reuters)
The hurricane in New York | Photo: Reuters
New York Hurricane (Photo: Reuters)
The hurricane in New York | Photo: Reuters

The New York Fire Department has rescued hundreds in the past day, assisting in moving residents stuck in their vehicles on the side of the road while the roads themselves were flooded.

New York subway flooded (Photo: Twitter)
The subway station is flooded in New York | Photo: Twitter

Hurricane Ida Damages in New Orleans, Louisiana, United States (Photo: Reuters)
Ida’s Damages in New Orleans | Photo: Reuters

Hurricane Ida Damages in New Orleans, Louisiana, United States (Photo: AP)
Hurricane Ida damage in New Orleans, Louisiana, USA | Photo: AP

According to forecasts Hurricane Ida has already crossed its peak and is nearing its end, but before that happens it will likely hit Connecticut and Massachusetts as well. Our forecaster, Matan Yaakov, added that what sets “Ida” apart from other hurricanes is the fact that the storm maintained its course over time and while the power level remained that of the hurricane.

We spoke to 17-year-old Levy, who is in New Jersey, who reported that he and his friends visiting the city were safe and sound – but that last night they had a difficult night: “At 9:00 p.m. We are used to seeing such an amount of rain – we went to sleep in the Chabad center and put mattresses on tables on which we slept, so that the water from the flood would not reach us. “

By Editor

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